Standing up for wild salmon

BC’s wild salmon are in crisis. Only bold and decisive action will revive the province's stocks.

While we have had some success keeping this issue at the top of government's agenda by securing a Wild Salmon Secretariat and a Wild Salmon Advisory Council with a direct line to the Premier, the government's slow movement on removing fish farms out of migratory routes is unacceptable.

Click here to watch Adam's reaction on YouTube.

Fish farms are a major threat facing wild salmon, but they are also at risk due to overfishing, climate change and habitat loss. As we continue to push government to keep its promise to get fish farms out of migratory routes, we will proactively work to take action in these other areas so that we can help support this iconic BC species.

Click here to find out how to tell the BC Government how you feel about their decision. 

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The province’s policy on salmon farms announced by the B.C. government today continues to put wild salmon at risk and fails to address the concerns of First Nations province wide. Read more: https://www.bcgreens.ca/salmon

“The crises facing BC’s wild salmon populations, while dire, provide an opportunity for action: stakeholders, first nations, and the public are aligned and eager for provincial leadership on this file like never before. people are ready to unite behind a wild salmon hero, a defender of the coast; the coastal economy and coastal environment.” Adam Olsen

Open-net farms and wild salmon have a history; review the recommendations and rulings for yourself here.

I tell salmon stories often. I am a Brentwood kid who grew up on the water; just one in a long line to fish the Salish Sea. We come by it honestly, descendants of the Coast Salish reef-netters, the Pacific salmon are part of our family.

Salmon emerged millions of years ago, evolving into six species in the Pacific Northwest. After the retreat of the glaciers, Chinook, Coho, sockeye, pink, chum and steelhead spread throughout the watersheds of what is now British Columbia.

During the current sitting of the legislature, Green Party MLAs repeatedly raised salmon and steelhead issues. It is thought to be the first time in the legislature that a party has made salmon such a significant focus of questions.
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