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Proportional Representation

Proportional Representation is a way of electing our MLAs to the legislature so that every vote counts. With Proportional Representation, a party’s share of the seats in the legislature is determined by how many votes it received in the last election.

Under our current First-Past-the-Post electoral system, the province usually ends up being run by a single political party, because our votes don't count equally. That's too much power for any one party to have when British Columbians didn't vote for it.

Seize this once-in-a-generation opportunity to take back our democracy with Proportional Representation.

Proportional Representation is a way of electing our MLAs to the legislature so that every vote counts. With Proportional Representation, a party’s share of the seats in the legislature is determined by how many votes it received in the last election.

The most important question to answer is Question 1, “Which system should British Columbians use for provincial elections”? The results of this question will determine our electoral system in the future.

All three proportional systems on the ballot will give British Columbians improved local representation and representation for our values and party preferences. If you don’t have a preference, all you have to do is answer Question 1 on the ballot in order to vote for Proportional Representation.

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The ProRep systems

All three will give British Columbians improved local representation and proportional representation for our values and party preferences. If you don’t have a preference, all you have to do is answer Question 1 on the ballot in order to vote for Proportional Representation.

Below is a short summary of the main differences between the three systems. For more detailed information on the systems on the ballot, please visit elections.bc.ca/referendum.

Dual member proportional (DMP)

Voting | Voters choose a party or independent candidate. Parties can nominate one or two candidates.

MLAs | Most ridings elect two MLAs; some rural ridings will continue to elect a single MLA. In two-member ridings, the first candidate from the party set or the single candidate that received the most votes is elected. The second MLA is elected from among the second candidates to give the province proportional representation.

Mixed member proportional (MMP)

Voting | Voters choose a preferred candidate (your "district vote") and choose a preferred party or regional candidate.

MLAs | The candidate with the most district votes is elected as the riding's MLA. Additional MLAs are elected to represent your region based on the results of the party or regional candidate vote.

Rural urban proportional (RUP)

Voting | Rural ridings use MMP. Urban ridings are larger and parties can nominate multiple candidates. Voters can vote for multiple candidates by ranking them in order of preference.

MLAs | Rural MLAs are elected using MMP. Urban ridings elect multiple MLAs (this is known as "STV" or Single Transferable Vote).

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