[MEDIA RELEASE] Despite available solutions, government offers no clear direction

VICTORIA BC – Today’s 2015 Speech from the Throne reveals a government short of ideas and content to coast while British Columbians continue to struggle with issues we can begin solving today, say Adam Olsen, Interim Leader of the B.C. Green Party, and Andrew Weaver, MLA for Oak Bay-Gordon Head and Deputy Leader of the B.C. Green Party.

Despite the mounting challenges facing families in British Columbia, the Throne Speech advanced no real ideas about how to grow the economy or help those who are most in need.

“If the government is running short on ideas, then they should feel free to borrow some of ours,” said Andrew Weaver. “Whether it’s rolling MSP premiums into our progressive tax system, or leveraging our renewable resources to attract new economic opportunities, there are plenty of things this government could and should be doing right now to actively strengthen and diversify our province.”

“Without fail, whenever an idea surfaces about how our government could address a pressing social or environmental issue, the government trots out its rhetoric that the best way to address them is to grow our economy,” said Adam. “The government has been saying for years that the economy is growing and they have yet to offer anything to British Columbians that will make our lives better.”

Within the next week, Weaver will speak to the Legislature, offering the BC Green Party’s response to the government’s Throne Speech. In doing so, he will offer a plan that will build on British Columbia's strengths to move us into a 21st century economy.

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Media contacts

For Adam Olsen, Interim-Leader
Stefan Jonsson
Director of Communications
1-888-473-3686 ext. 3
stefan.jonsson@greenparty.bc.ca

For Andrew Weaver, MLA for Oak Bay-Gordon Head and Deputy Leader
Mat Wright
Press Secretary
250.216.3382
mat.wright@leg.bc.ca

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  • commented 2015-02-12 19:10:45 -0800
    Rolling ever-increasing MSP fees into a progressive tax system would be a start, but I’m wondering why we have MSP “premiums” (taxes or surcharges) at all? Most other provinces don’t have them.
    Gerry Warner
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